Click here to close Hello! We notice that you are using Internet Explorer, which is not supported by Echinobase and may cause the site to display incorrectly. We suggest using a current version of Chrome, FireFox, or Safari.
Echinobase
ECB-ART-41339
J Gen Physiol 1930 Mar 20;134:483-94. doi: 10.1085/jgp.13.4.483.
Show Gene links Show Anatomy links

THE CATALYTIC EFFECT OF DYES ON THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF LIVING CELLS.

Barron ES , Hoffman LA .


Abstract
From the experiments described in this paper and in those previously published it can be concluded that dyes which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced, act as catalysts for some oxidative processes taking place in the living cells, as is manifested by an increase in their oxygen consumption. It has been found that the catalytic power of the dyes on the oxygen consumption of starfish eggs (mature, unfertilized) is conditioned by two factors: the reduction potential of the dye and the permeability of the cell surface. Dyes whose E''(o) is towards the positive side of the aerobic reduction potential of the starfish eggs have a maximum catalytic effect. This catalytic power decreases as the E''(o) becomes more negative than the reduction potential of the cell and becomes nil beyond certain limits. When a dye cannot penetrate into the cell, its effect is greatly diminished as in this case only those oxidative processes taking place at the outer surface of the cell can be activated. Whether a dye can act as a catalyst or not is dependent on whether the normal consumption of oxygen by the cell is slower or quicker than the oxidation activated by the dye. The speed of this activation is correlated to (1) the speed at which the dye is reduced by the cell, and (2) the speed at which the leuco-dye is oxidized by the atmospheric oxygen. If one of these two processes is slower than the normal respiration, the dye cannot increase the rate of oxygen consumption (phenol indophenol at low concentrations which is kept reduced by the cell is very slowly reoxidized by atmospheric oxygen, on the other hand safranin and neutral red which are not reduced by the cell or at least too slowly reduced, though rapidly reoxidized by air). It will depend on these two reactions velocities whether a dye will act as catalyst (methylene blue and dyes with similar E''(o) which are quickly reduced by the cell and the leuco-dyes of which are relatively quickly reoxidized). Though this relationship between the reduction potential of the dyes and its catalytic power would seem in contradiction with the well known thermodynamic assumption that there is in general no distinct relationship between the potential and velocity of the reaction, we have pointed out from the literature some of the various experiments where one does recognize this connection.

PubMed ID: 19872541
PMC ID: PMC2141061
Article link: J Gen Physiol


Genes referenced: LOC115919910 LOC590297 srpl

References :
Harrop, STUDIES ON BLOOD CELL METABOLISM : I. THE EFFECT OF METHYLENE BLUE AND OTHER DYES UPON THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF MAMMALIAN AND AVIAN ERYTHROCYTES. 1928, Pubmed