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ECB-ART-49474
J Hazard Mater 2021 Apr 05;407:124384. doi: 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.124384.
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Sea urchin-like FeOOH functionalized electrochemical CNT filter for one-step arsenite decontamination.

Liu Y , Yang S , Jiang H , Yang B , Fang X , Shen C , Yang J , Sand W , Li F .


Abstract
Advanced nanotechnologies for efficient arsenic decontamination remain largely underdeveloped. The most abundant inorganic arsenic species are neutrally-charged arsenate, As(III), and negatively-charged arsenite, As(V). Compared with As(V), As(III) is 60 times more toxic and more difficult to remove due to high mobility. Herein, an electrochemical filtration system was rationally designed for one-step As(III) decontamination. The key to this technology is a functional electroactive carbon nanotube (CNT) filter functionalized with sea urchin-like FeOOH. With the assistance of electric field, CNT-FeOOH anodic filter can in situ transform As(III) to less toxic As(V) while passing through. Then, as-produced As(V) could be effectively sequestrated by FeOOH. The sufficient exposed sorption sites, flow-through design, and filter's electrochemical reactivity synergistically guaranteed a rapid arsenic removal kinetic. The underlying working mechanism was unveiled based on systematic experimental investigations and theoretical calculations. The system efficacy can be adapted across a wide pH range and environmental matrixes. Exhausted CNT-FeOOH filters could be effectively regenerated by chemical washing with diluted NaOH solution. Outcomes of the present study are dedicated to provide a straightforward and effective strategy by integrating electrochemistry, nanotechnology, and membrane separation for the removal of arsenic and other similar heavy metals from water bodies.

PubMed ID: 33229265
Article link: J Hazard Mater